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dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Bryanen
dc.date2013-11-28 17:24:50.815
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-29T16:34:56Z
dc.date.issued2013-11-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/8488
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Civil Engineering) -- Queen's University, 2013-11-28 17:24:50.815en
dc.description.abstractThe goals of this research are to develop and validate the use of distributed fibre optic sensors for use in strain monitoring of buried culverts, and to use full-scale experiments to evaluate the performance of both deteriorated steel and reinforced concrete culverts rehabilitated with grouted slipliners subjected to surface loading. Bench scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of fibre optic sensors against conventional strain sensors. Then, fibre optic sensors were attached to a full-scale culvert that was tested in a buried state as a proof of concept. Finally, fibre optic sensors were used in two large scale buried pipe tests to explore the performance of rehabilitated flexible and rigid culverts. A deteriorated steel culvert was tested in a buried state under surface loading, then rehabilitated with a grouted high density polyethylene (HDPE) slipliner while still in a buried state and tested under surface loading at 0.9 m and 0.6 m burial depths. The rehabilitated steel pipe was tested under service loading, and up to 1250 kN of applied load. The results suggested that the grouted annulus stiffened the overall structure, and increased the capacity of the system to over 3 times the fully factored design load. A deteriorated reinforced concrete culvert was tested and rehabilitated in a similar fashion. The grout in the annulus penetrated the cracks at the crown, invert and joint of the concrete pipeline. The lined concrete pipe was tested to 1200 kN under single axle loading, and to 800 kN under single wheel loading. The results suggested that while the concrete pipe was stiffened by the grout, it remained the primary contributor to structural capacity, with the liner contributing little to the capacity. Repair reduced the diameter change by an average of 90%, with the capacity reaching approximately 3.3 and 4.2 times the design loads for single axle and single wheel pair loading, respectively. The maximum response was under single axle loading over the barrels of the concrete pipe. In no instance did the structures reach an ultimate limit state, and the tests were stopped after bearing failure of the soil occurred.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectDeteriorated Pipeen
dc.subjectPolymer Linersen
dc.subjectSliplineren
dc.subjectSurface Loadsen
dc.subjectPipe Rehabilitationen
dc.subjectReinforced Concrete Pipeen
dc.subjectCulvert Rehabilitationen
dc.subjectSlipliningen
dc.subjectSteel Pipeen
dc.subjectFibre Optic Strain Sensorsen
dc.subjectDistributed Strain Sensingen
dc.subjectRehabilitationen
dc.titleBehaviour of Deteriorated Pipes Rehabilitated With Grouted Sliplinersen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.restricted-thesisThesis is to be restricted to allow for the publication of journal papers prior to the release of this thesis document.en
dc.description.degreeM.A.Sc.en
dc.contributor.supervisorMoore, Ian D.en
dc.contributor.departmentCivil Engineeringen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2018-11-28
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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